NO MORE WEEK HAS FINALLY ARRIVED! JOIN US IN CELEBRATING THE ONE YEAR ANNIVERSARY OF OUR LAUNCH

NO MORE WEEK HAS FINALLY ARRIVED! JOIN US IN CELEBRATING THE ONE YEAR ANNIVERSARY OF OUR LAUNCH.

NO MORE partner events and activities will take place coast to coast, and we hope you will join in! Here are some ways:

  • USE THE HASHTAG #NOMOREWEEK TO SPEAK OUT AGAINST DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AND SEXUAL ASSAULT ON SOCIAL MEDIA. 

  • HELP US SPOTLIGHT DOMESTIC VIOLENCE & SEXUAL ASSAULT NATIONWIDE BY PARTICIPATING IN THE #NOMOREWEEK PHOTO CHALLENGE.
    • DOWNLOAD THIS POSTER & SHARE WHY YOU SAY NO MORE. 
    • TAKE A PHOTO WITH YOUR MESSAGE & UPLOAD TO THE NO MORE GALLERY.  DON’T FORGET TO SELECT YOUR STATE!
    • HELP US REACH ALL 50 STATES AND CHECK OUR FACEBOOK PAGE DURING #NOMOREWEEK TO SEE YOUR PHOTOS SPREAD THE NO MORE MESSAGE NATIONWIDE.

THE CELEBRITY MALE ROLE MODEL PIXEL REVEAL CAMPAIGN: ENDING VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN, ONE PIXEL AT A TIME

The Pixel Project, a global volunteer-led virtual non-profit organisation working to end Violence Against Women (VAW), is proud to launch the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign on the 101st International Women’s Day (8 March 2014). This campaign aims to raise US$1 million in aid of the U.S.A.’s National Coalition Against Domestic Violence (www.ncadv.org) and The Pixel Project while highlighting the important role men and boys play in stopping VAW. The campaign will kick off with a special series of live Google Hangouts featuring a mix of prominent anti-VAW activists and popular authors.

The Pixel Reveal campaign rallies the global audience to collectively unveil an online million-pixel mystery collage of world-exclusive celebrity male role model portraits by donating US$1 per pixel. Each donation triggers the automatic reveal of the equivalent number of pixels. For example, a $10 donation will trigger the reveal of 10 pixels. As more pixels are revealed, the cover picture will fade out to uncover the portraits underneath it. When a celebrity male role model is revealed, an exclusive anti-VAW public service announcement from him will be launched. The distinguished line-up includes a Nobel Laureate, a two-time Pulitzer Prize Winner and superstar Environmentalist; and their portraits are taken by award-winning international photographer, Jillian Edelstein. Donations start at as little as $10.

Through the Pixel Reveal campaign, The Pixel Project is working to accelerate a major paradigm change that is crucial for efforts to end VAW, by highlighting positive male role models to inspire men and boys to join the anti-VAW movement. VAW has always been stereotyped as a ‘women’s issue’. In reality, it is a human rights issue that impacts families and communities. Men may be the majority of perpetrators of VAW, but good, non-violent men far outnumber them and have largely remained silent on the issue. For VAW to end, these men need to be involved in efforts to end the violence. The Pixel Reveal campaign intends to do just that by triggering conversations about VAW worldwide and inspiring men and boys to take action to stop VAW in their communities.

To launch the campaign, a series of live Google Hangouts will be held between 8 - 31 March 2014 to kick-start conversations about VAW and to encourage donations in support of the campaign. Anti-VAW activist speakers taking part include UN Women, The Pixel Project, the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence, the White Ribbon Campaign, Breakthrough/Bell Bajao, a panel of smartphone safety experts (Circle of 6, PFO tech) and a panel of documentary filmmakers who focus on the issue of VAW (Evan Grae Davis, Lisa F. Jackson). The bestselling and award-winning authors doing readings with Q&A sessions in support of the campaign include Cornelia Funke, Isaac Marion, Jacqueline Carey, and Kelley Armstrong.
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Regina Yau, Founder and President of The Pixel Project, said: “Violence against women is one of the most widespread and entrenched human rights violations in the world and The Pixel Project is delighted that our world-famous male role models, fellow anti-VAW activists and allies, and acclaimed authors have stepped up to join us in raising much needed funds and widespread support for this cause. VAW has long been a taboo issue and we hope that this campaign will help break the silence surrounding this violence by sparking conversation about VAW in communities across the world.”

Rita Smith, Executive Director of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence said: The Pixel Project’s Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign is an amazing and creative idea to help us engage more male allies, share information across the globe to those in need, and connect with activists around the world working to end violence against women. We must join together if we ever hope to reduce these kind of crimes, and we are thrilled to be partnering with The Pixel Project on this journey.

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For further information, please contact:

Regina Yau or Carol Olson - info@thepixelproject.net / pixelprojectteam@gmail.com

About The Pixel Project (www.thepixelproject.net)
The Pixel Project is a complete virtual, volunteer-led global 501(c)3 non-profit organisation whose mission is to raise awareness, funds and volunteer power for the cause to end violence against women using the power of the internet, social media, new technologies and popular culture/the arts. Their flagship campaign, the Celebrity Male Role Model Pixel Reveal campaign, aims to raise US$1 million for the U.S.A.’s National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Pixel Project by getting a global audience to collectively unveil a million-pixel mystery collage of Celebrity Male Role Models at US$1 per pixel.

Legislative Alert: House Bill for Rape Survivor Family Protection Act - HB958

5% of rape victims of reproductive age (age 12-45) became pregnant as a result of rape, with the majority of pregnancies in adolescents.  Under Maryland state law, rapists who impregnate women in the course of sexually assaulting them have full parental rights.

House Bill 958 will change this.  This bill will allow rape victims who become pregnant as a result of rape to ask the family law court to end the parental rights of the rapist.  The high standard of proof used in other termination of parental rights cases would be required:  clear and convincing evidence.  Rape victims should have to meet the same standard used in other termination of parental rights cases – no more, no less.

These bills have overwhelming support from:

  • Maryland Legislative Agenda for Women
  • Women’s Law Center of Maryland
  • Maryland Chapter of the National Social Workers Association
  • NARAL Pro-Choice Maryland
  • Maryland Catholic Conference
  • Planned Parenthood of Maryland
  • Adoptions Together
  • Governor Martin O’Malley
  • Attorney General Douglas Gansler
  • Maryland Department of Human Resources

Your voices make a difference - please call or email this week.  The email addresses and telephone numbers for the committee members are provided below for your convenience, and we invite you to visit http://www.mcasa.org/law-public-policy/legislative-agenda/ to learn more about this year’s MCASA legislative agenda.

Thank you, as always, for your support for sexual assault survivors.


Lisae

Lisae C. Jordan
Executive Director and Counsel
 

House Judiciary Committee:  Phone Numbers & Emails

Allegany County
Kevin Kelly
Phone: 410-841-3404 
Email: kevin.kelly@house.state.md.us

Baltimore City
Curt Anderson
Phone: 410-841-3291
Email: curt.anderson@house.state.md.us

Jill P. Carter
Phone: 410-841-3283
Email: jill.carter@house.state.md.us

Luke H. Clippinger
Phone: 410-841-3303
Email: luke.clippinger@house.state.md.us

Frank M. Conaway, Jr.
Phone: 410-841-3189
Email: frank.conaway@house.state.md.us

Sandy (Samuel) Rosenberg
Phone: 410-841-3297
Email: samuel.rosenberg@house.state.md.us

Baltimore County
John W. E. Cluster, Jr.
Phone: 410-841-3526
Email: john.cluster@house.state.md.us

Cecil, Caroline, Kent, & Queen Anne’s Counties
Michael D. Smigiel, Sr.
Phone: 410-841-3555
Email: michael.smigiel@house.state.md.us

Cecil & Harford Counties
Glen Glass
Phone: 410-841-3280
Email: glen.glass@house.state.md.us

Frederick & Washington Counties
Michael J. Hough
Phone: 410-841-3472
Email: michael.hough@house.state.md.us

Harford County
Susan K. McComas
Phone: 410-841-3272
Email: susan.mccomas@house.state.md.us

Montgomery County
Kathleen M. Dumais, Vice-Chair
Phone: 410-841-3052
Email: kathleen.dumais@house.state.md.us

Sam Arora
Phone: 410-841-3528
Email: sam.arora@house.state.md.us

Susan C. Lee
Phone: 410-841-3649
Email: susan.lee@house.state.md.us

Luiz R. S. Simmons
Phone: 410-841-3037
Email: luiz.simmons@house.state.md.us

Jeffrey D. Waldstreicher
Phone: 410-841-3130
Email: jeff.waldstreicher@house.state.md.us

Prince George’s and Calvert Counties
Joseph F. Vallario, Jr., Chair
Phone: 410-841-3488
Email: joseph.vallario@house.state.md.us

Prince George’s County
Darren M. Swain
Phone: 410-841-3692
Email: darren.swain@house.state.md.us

Kriselda Valderrama
Phone: 410-841-3210
Email: kris.valderrama@house.state.md.us

Geraldine Valentino-Smith
Phone: 410-841-3101
Email: geraldine.valentino@house.state.md.us

Washington County
Neil C. Parrott
Phone: 410-841-3636
Email: neil.parrott@house.state.md.us

Wicomico & Worcester Counties
Michael A. McDermott
Phone: 410-841-3431
Email: mike.mcdermott@house.state.md.us

Be A Part of No More Week

NO MORE WEEK, MARCH 17-21, 2014, MARKS THE ONE YEAR ANNIVERSARY OF OUR LAUNCH.

NO MORE partner events and activities will take place coast to coast, and we hope you will join in! Here are some ways:

  • HELP US KICK OFF NO MORE WEEK BY ADDING YOUR SUPPORT TO OUR SOCIAL MEDIA THUNDERCLAP RIGHT NOW. 
  • HELP US SPOTLIGHT DOMESTIC VIOLENCE & SEXUAL ASSAULT NATIONWIDE BY PARTICIPATING IN THE #NOMOREWEEK PHOTO CHALLENGE.  
    • DOWNLOAD THIS POSTER & SHARE WHY YOU SAY NO MORE. 
    • TAKE A PHOTO WITH YOUR MESSAGE & UPLOAD TO THE NO MORE GALLERY.  DON’T FORGET  TO SELECT YOUR STATE!
    • HELP US REACH ALL 50 STATES AND CHECK OUR FACEBOOK PAGE DURING #NOMOREWEEK, MARCH 17TH-21ST, TO SEE YOUR PHOTOS SPREAD THE NO MORE  MESSAGE NATIONWIDE.

Protect Teens from Sexual Exploitation by Persons in Authority - Ask your Legislator to Report Favorably on SB460 and HB781

Maryland’s law fails to prohibit sexual conduct between teenagers and a wide range of people with authority over children. Adults with authority over teenagers and other children should not use their position to sexually exploit the minors they work with. The current law fails to protect teens by imposing complicated and nonsensical distinctions between educators and non-educators, full-time and part-time, permanent and provisional, under supervision and not. Current law leaves out persons in authority who are volunteers and those who work outside of pre-school, elementary schools, and secondary schools. Articles like this one in the Washington Post and other media highlight this loophole.

MCASA has worked for over a decade to pass comprehensive legislation to address the gaps in the law and prevent sexual exploitation of teens. Year after year, we have seen legislation fail because of the debate between those who are concerned about criminalizing sexual relationships between people who are close in age, and those who are unyielding in their view that all adults who are sexually involved with the 16 or 17 year olds they have authority over are criminals.

This is an important debate and one that should continue. However, MCASA also believes that we can and should pass legislation addressing areas of agreement and are grateful to the sponsors of SB460 and HB781 for proposing compromise legislation that will make huge strides towards closing the loopholes in our law. SB460 and HB781 will:

retain the current 25 year penalty for all adults who sexually exploit teens during the time the teen is directly in their care and custody or supervision
increase potential penalties from a sentence of one year to five years for persons in authority who have sexual interactions with 16- and 17-year olds during “off-hours”
expand the prohibition on sexual relations between persons in authority and teens to include volunteers
expand the prohibition on sexual relations between persons in authority and teens to include sports and recreation programs
close current loopholes permitting part-time school teachers and coaches to have sexual relations with students during “off-hours”
Senator Jamie Raskin, Delegate Luke Clippinger, Senator Jennie Forehand, Senator Nancy King and the other co-sponsors deserve our support for introducing legislation to move the law forward. Their bill includes a compromise: it will apply the prohibition only when there is a 7 year age gap when the sexual interaction occurred during “off-hours” (no age gap would be required when the teen is under the direct care or supervision of the adult). This compromise is bringing us closer to passing a bill than we have been for many years. Even those who are concerned about cases involving young adults and teens acknowledge that if there is larger age gap, the criminal law should step in.

Legislation is an incremental process. SB460 and HB781 would make huge progress but are being threatened by those who want a perfect bill. MCASA appreciates their concerns and agree that the 7 year age gap for “off-hours” is an imperfect policy. But it is a real step forward and efforts to create a perfect bill have left teens without any protection for years and years. It’s time to move ahead and enact legislation to increase protections for teens.

Please call your legislators and ask them to report favorably on SB460 and HB781.
Contact the senators and delegates from your district. If you work at a sexual assault program, please also call the senators from the districts you serve.

Your voices make a difference for survivors.

A list of Committee members is below.

Thank you,

Lisae C. Jordan, Esq.
Executive Director & Counsel
Maryland Coalition Against Sexual Assault

Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee: Phone Numbers & Emails

Baltimore City
Lisa A. Gladden, Vice-Chair
(410) 841-3697
lisa.gladden@senate.state.md.us

Baltimore County
James Brochin
(410) 841-3648 
jim.brochin@senate.state.md.us

Norman R. Stone, Jr.
(410) 841-3587
norman.stone@senate.state.md.us

Robert A. Zirkin
(410) 841-3131
bobby.zirkin@senate.state.md.us

Cecil, Caroline Kent, and Queen Anne’s Counties
Stephen Hershey, Jr.
(410) 841-3639
steve.hershey@senate.state.md.us

Cecil & Harford Counties
Nancy Jacobs
(410) 841-3158
nancy.jacobs@senate.state.md.us

Montgomery County
Brian E. Frosh, Chair
(410) 841-3124
brian.frosh@senate.state.md.us

Jennie M. Forehand
(410) 841-3134
jennie.forehand@senate.state.md.us

Jamin B. (Jamie) Raskin
(410) 841-3634
jamie.raskin@senate.state.md.us

Washington County
Christopher B. Shank
(410) 841-3903
christopher.shank@senate.state.md.us

House Judiciary Committee: Phone Numbers & Emails

Allegany County
Kevin Kelly
Phone: 410-841-3404 
Email: kevin.kelly@house.state.md.us

Baltimore City
Curt Anderson
Phone: 410-841-3291
Email: curt.anderson@house.state.md.us

Jill P. Carter
Phone: 410-841-3283
Email: jill.carter@house.state.md.us

Luke H. Clippinger
Phone: 410-841-3303
Email: luke.clippinger@house.state.md.us

Frank M. Conaway, Jr.
Phone: 410-841-3189
Email: frank.conaway@house.state.md.us

Sandy (Samuel) Rosenberg
Phone: 410-841-3297
Email: samuel.rosenberg@house.state.md.us

Baltimore County
John W. E. Cluster, Jr.
Phone: 410-841-3526
Email: john.cluster@house.state.md.us

Cecil, Caroline, Kent, & Queen Anne’s Counties
Michael D. Smigiel, Sr.
Phone: 410-841-3555
Email: michael.smigiel@house.state.md.us

Cecil & Harford Counties
Glen Glass
Phone: 410-841-3280
Email: glen.glass@house.state.md.us

Frederick & Washington Counties
Michael J. Hough
Phone: 410-841-3472
Email: michael.hough@house.state.md.us

Harford County
Susan K. McComas
Phone: 410-841-3272
Email: susan.mccomas@house.state.md.us

Montgomery County
Kathleen M. Dumais, Vice-Chair
Phone: 410-841-3052
Email: kathleen.dumais@house.state.md.us

Sam Arora
Phone: 410-841-3528
Email: sam.arora@house.state.md.us

Susan C. Lee
Phone: 410-841-3649
Email: susan.lee@house.state.md.us

Luiz R. S. Simmons
Phone: 410-841-3037
Email: luiz.simmons@house.state.md.us

Jeffrey D. Waldstreicher
Phone: 410-841-3130
Email: jeff.waldstreicher@house.state.md.us

Prince George’s and Calvert Counties
Joseph F. Vallario, Jr., Chair
Phone: 410-841-3488
Email: joseph.vallario@house.state.md.us

Prince George’s County
Darren M. Swain
Phone: 410-841-3692
Email: darren.swain@house.state.md.us

Kriselda Valderrama
Phone: 410-841-3210
Email: kris.valderrama@house.state.md.us

Geraldine Valentino-Smith
Phone: 410-841-3101
Email: geraldine.valentino@house.state.md.us

Washington County
Neil C. Parrott
Phone: 410-841-3636
Email: neil.parrott@house.state.md.us

Wicomico & Worcester Counties
Michael A. McDermott
Phone: 410-841-3431
Email: mike.mcdermott@house.state.md.us

Human Trafficking and the Courts

On January 27th, the National Human Trafficking Resource Center (NHTRC) received its 100,000th call from a caller looking for legal services.

Since December 2007, the NHTRC has worked on 532 cases in which callers requested assistance in accessing legal services. Some calls are from individuals expressing fear of going to court to testify against their trafficker. Others are from judges, attorneys, and victim advocates calling to ask about red flags after seeing someone in court they believed to be a victim of human trafficking. Indeed, victims of human trafficking interact with various aspects of the justice system, in civil and criminal matters, from juvenile justice to family court, to probation and services, and this month we want to share with you information about these intersections.

Stories like Julie’s remind us of the myriad of ways in which victims interact with the justice system, and why it’s important to be aware of these intersections.

Julie called the National Human Trafficking Resource Center (NHTRC) seeking help. Julie had been trafficked by a pimp for commercial sex several years earlier and was now being asked to serve as a witness in a trial against her former pimp. Julie was worried that friends of the pimp might be present in the court room and felt threatened and was considering not going through with the court proceedings. The NHTRC connected her to an experienced advocate to explore her options.

Julie’s story demonstrates how important it is for legal professionals to be aware of the signs of human trafficking, and to be equipped to assist individuals like Julie. Whether you are an attorney, judge, court officer, service provider, or other allied professional, understanding how and where victims come into contact with the justice system is an important first step in identifying and assisting these individuals. To this end, the NHTRC has created a one-page resource, entitled Victims of Human Trafficking: Intersections with the Court System, which provides indicators that a person might be a victim, safety considerations, and tips on how victims and others can access help through the NHTRC. This resource, along with several others, can be found on our website.

*Vignettes are representative of the types of calls received by the National Human Trafficking Resource Center (NHTRC) hotline and are meant for informational purposes only. Names, locations, and other identifying information have been changed and/or omitted to preserve the confidentiality of the people

LT. GOVERNOR BROWN LEADS PANEL IN SUPPORT OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE BILLS

House Judiciary Committee hears from Lt. Governor, State’s Attorney Alsobrooks, Advocates and Stakeholders on bills to expand protections for victims

ANNAPOLIS, MD. Today, Lt. Governor Anthony G. Brown testified before the House Judiciary Committee in support of the Administration’s legislative package to expand protections for victims of domestic violence and sexual assault. The package includes three bills, which were developed through input from various stakeholders, including victims’ advocates as well as law enforcement. Prince George’s County State’s Attorney Angela Alsobrooks and other representatives from these stakeholder groups were on the Lt. Governor’s panel today.

“Reducing domestic violence is a responsibility we all share; it doesn’t discriminate and can touch any family,” said Lt. Governor Brown. “We’re making progress, but it’s not enough until every Marylander is free from the fear of this senseless crime. The legislation we’re proposing today will help reduce domestic violence in Maryland and is critical to ensuring that we continue to make Maryland a better, safer place for families.”

"Despite our record crime reduction over the last three years, domestic violence is an area where we still have challenges,” said Prince George’s County State’s Attorney Angela Alsobrooks. “Last year, nine of our homicides were domestic related and we are also seeing that children who witness domestic violence are becoming abusers themselves or otherwise coming into our court system in a negative way. These bills will ensure that those who commit acts of domestic violence, especially in the presence of children, will be held accountable for their actions. We hope that this will provide a lasting sense of peace and safety for those impacted by this terrible crime."

The first bill, Peace and Protective Orders – Burden of Proof (HB 307), would modify the standard of proof when a victim seeks to obtain a final peace order or a final protective order from “clear and convincing evidence” to “a preponderance of the evidence.” Currently, Maryland is the only state in the nation that uses this higher standard of proof for final protective orders. Holding final protective orders to a higher standard than other legal claims has had an adverse impact on victims’ ability to gain relief. Of the nearly 5,700 final peace or protective orders that were denied last year alone, 3,500 of those were because the victim could not meet the standard of “clear and convincing evidence.” The Senate passed the cross-file of this bill (SB 333) unanimously on February 7.

“I look forward to working with Lt. Governor Brown and state lawmakers to finally end Maryland’s distinction as the only state that requires victims to prove that abuse occurred by clear & convincing evidence before they can obtain a protective order to help stop domestic violence,” said Lisae Jordan, Executive Director, Maryland Coalition Against Sexual Assault. “This inappropriately high standard of proof sends the message that our legal system views victims with suspicion and mistrust. It’s time for Maryland to join the rest of the nation and support victims by allowing them to obtain protection based on a preponderance of evidence.”

Another bill, Domestic Violence – Permanent Final Protective Orders (HB 309), seeks to amend current law and protect victims by adding second degree assault to the list of crimes for which a person can obtain a permanent final protective order. The bill would require that an abuser only be sentenced to at least 5 years in prison, as opposed to serving at least 5 years before the victim can obtain a permanent final protective order. The Senate passed the cross-file of this bill (SB 334) unanimously on February 14.

"Over the years, we’ve worked with Lt. Governor Brown to end domestic violence in Maryland, and he’s been a true partner in that effort. By working together, we’re going to pass this legislation, making it easier for victims to get a final permanent domestic order if their abuser is convicted of second degree assault, said Dorothy Lennig, Legal Clinic Director at House of Ruth Maryland. "Based on our work in Baltimore City, we know that in 2013 over 90% of domestic violence cases were second degree assault."

Lastly, the third bill, Crimes Committed in the Presence of a Minor (HB 306/ SB 337), seeks to break the cycle of domestic violence by taking a targeted approach to crimes committed in the presence of a minor. In order to both discourage this behavior and hold abusers accountable, the legislation would give courts the ability to impose an enhanced penalty of up to 5 years - in addition to any other imposed sentence - for crimes of violence that are both domestically related and committed in the presence of a minor. Studies have shown that domestic violence has a lifelong impact on children. Boys who have experience with violence, are more likely to be aggressive in their relationships and girls more likely to put up with violence when they are adults.

Since 2007, Lt. Governor Brown, who leads the Administration’s efforts to reduce domestic violence, has worked with the General Assembly to enact several pieces of legislation protecting victims. In 2009, Brown led successful efforts to improve domestic violence laws by giving judges the authority to take guns out of the hands of domestic abusers. Brown championed legislation enacted in 2010 allowing a victim of domestic abuse to terminate a residential lease with a copy of a final protective order. Additionally, in 2012, Brown led efforts to allow Marylanders to apply for unemployment benefits when forced to leave a job to escape the threat of domestic violence. The Lt. Governor also continues to lead efforts to increase the availability of hospital-based domestic violence screening programs in Maryland.

These measures, and Lt. Governor Brown’s continued cooperation with lawmakers, stakeholders, law enforcement, and domestic violence and sexual assault advocates, have contributed to a 20% decrease in domestic violence assaults and a 32% decrease in the number of women and children that have died from domestic violence over the last seven years.

Maryland Senate passes “rape by proxy” bill


Thank you to the Maryland Senate and Senator Brian Frosh for passing SB50.  This bill would outlaw so-called “rape by proxy” — in which someone posts information about another person advertising that they would welcome being sexually assaulted. The bill, sponsored by Sen. Brian E. Frosh, a Montgomery County Democrat, would set a maximum penalty of 20 years and a $25,000 fine for violations.

The legislation was prompted in part by a case in Prince George’s County in which a woman’s ex-husband posted ads on a website and sent messages through social media in which the man posed as his ex-wife and invited people to go to her house and fulfill what was described as her rape fantasy.

According to Frosh and his co-sponsor, Del. Kathleen Dumais, also a Montgomery Democrat, more than 50 strangers showed up at the woman’s house over a two-week period expecting to have violent sex with her or her children.

This is one of MCASA’s top priorities this session.

On to the House!